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ANTH 100 SURVEY OF ANTHROPOLOGY ~ 5
Introduction to anthropology stressing human origins, cultural diversity, and bio-cultural-ecological adaptations.  Topics include human inheritance, evolution, human fossils, prehistoric cultures, and a comparison of resource consumption and economics, human impact on the natural environment, family, politics, values, communication, expressive arts, religion, culture change and globalization. (SSgs)

ANTH 204 ARCHAEOLOGY ~ 5
Between the history of archaeology and the problems faced today, this course examines the theories and methods used to interpret what's left of the world's lost cultures. Topics include: how artifacts are dated, how people used technology to survive in different environments, how they organized their societies, and developed their ideologies. (SS s)

ANTH 205 BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY ~ 5
A basic understanding of the evolution of the human species from a biological perspective.  Human adaptation through the interaction of biology and culture is a primary focus for this course.  Students will gain an understanding of the principles of genetics, primate behavior, primate and human fossils, early prehistoric cultures, and human variation and adaptation. (MS s)

ANTH 206 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY ~ 5
Study of culture and society with a cross-cultural perspective of human adaptation to the bio-cultural environment. Topics include technology, resource consumption and economics, medicine, family, social groups, political systems, religion, expressive arts, language, values, culture change, human impact on the environment, and globalization. Prerequisites: ENGL 100/ESLA 117 or placement in ENGL &101. (SSwgs)

ANTH 210 INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA ~ 5
A survey of North American Indigenous peoples emphasizing cultural-ecological adaptations from prehistoric times to the present;  survival of traditional cultures through analyses of prehistory, languages, traditional land use, sustaining natural resources, social organization, religions, values, arts, and culture change. Special consideration given to Northwest Coast and Northwest Plateau peoples. (SSds)

ANTH 216 NORTHWEST COAST INDIANS ~ 5
An anthropological overview of the unique cultural-ecological adaptations of coastal peoples from Oregon to southern Alaska.  Topics include cultural-ecological adaptations, languages, traditional land use, sustaining natural resources, social organization, religious beliefs and values, art, historic changes and adaptations, and modern issues.  Particular emphasis on Salish people of Northwest Washington. (SSds)

BUSAD 280 SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS PRACTICES I ~ 3
This class is the first of a three part series .  The focus of this course is measuring, tracking, & implementing sustainability in a business/institutional setting.  The class will provide a practical introduction to sustainability, business and leadership practices.  Topics covered will include: energy efficiency, transportation, water, and zero waste.  Recommended preparation:  students have professional work experience OR have completed a basic series of business, economics, political science, and/or related coursework.  (UEs)

BUSAD 281 SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS PRACTICES II ~ 3
This is the second course in a three part series.  The focus of this course is the sustainable supply chain. Topics covered will include: responsible purchasing, renewable energy, sustainable food, sustainable building and development, and alternate sources of revenue and/or savings.  Prerequisite:  BUSAD 280 or permission of instructor.  (UEs)

BUSAD 282 SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS PRACTICES III ~ 3
This is the third course in a three part series.  The focus of this course is the sustainable business model.  Topics covered will include: triple bottom line accounting, leadership skills for change agents, corporate social responsibility, employee ownership, and marketing.  Prerequisite:  BUSAD 281 or permission of instructor.  (UEs)

CIS 100 COMPUTER LITERACY ~ 3 or 5
Introduction to the practical application of computers and communication technology.  Includes the major components of computer systems, user interfaces, applications, networking, and societal issues surrounding  computing, including ethics, privacy, security, and sustainability.  (UEs)

CMST 225 INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION ~ 3 or 5
The course introduces the student to practices and principles in the field of communication as they apply to face to face interaction with peoples of diverse cultures both within the U.S. and out. The course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and opportunity to apply skills learned in class to their everyday encounters. Topics covered include intercultural barriers, cultural values, worldview, and the interrelation between the environment and social systems that underpin culture.  Prerequisite: ENGL 100/ESLA117 or placement in ENGL& 101 and one of the following CMST& 101, 210, 220, or 230.  (SS,Hwdgs)

ECON 110 PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS ~ 5
Designed for non-business majors who would like to know the cost of environmental issues in an economic context.  Provides the student with a strong background on the theory of environmental economics and recent policy issues.  Covers current methods of making implied costs including global warming, ozone depletion, and pollution of air and water.  Covers concepts rather than mathematical proofs and justification.  Includes research strategies.  (SSgs)

ENGL 124 ENVIRONMENTAL LITERATURE ~ 5
The course will explore literature as a vehicle for environmental awareness internationally. Reading, writing, and discussion will facilitate an understanding of a writer's connection with nature and environmental issues. A critical understanding of, and appreciation for, the relationship between a writer, the environment, and sense of place will be emphasized.  Prerequisite:  ENGL 100/ESLA 117 or placement in ENGL& 101.  (Hwgs)

ENVS 100 SURVEY OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE ~ 5
Introductory non-laboratory course in biology emphasizing the environment and its living organisms.  Includes discussion of early evolution, energy, ecosystems, and populations, and the balance between man and his environment. Prerequisite:  ENGL 100/ESLA 117 or placement in ENGL& 101. (MSws)

GEOG 100 INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHY ~ 5
Introduction to basic principles of physical and human geography.  Covers patterns of settlement, population, resource and economic development, climates, and landforms.  (SSgs)

GEOG 105 WORLD GEOGRAPHY IN TRANSITION ~ 5
A study of the world in terms of its physical, historical, cultural, economic, and environmental factors.  Course focuses on each region of the world and how its residents create their own cultural landscape.  (SSgs)

GEOG 110 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY ~ 5
This course is presented from a social science perspective toward the physical processes on the surface of the earth, including landforms, weather, river systems, earthquakes and volcanoes; and how these processes affect humans and their societies and environments.  This class will include investigative activities, field trips and outdoor experiments.  (SSgs)

GEOG 115 PACIFIC NORTHWEST GEOGRAPHY ~ 5
This course explores the cultural and physical geography of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Alaska and Lower British Columbia.  During this course students will examine physical geography concepts and their relationship to settlement, population, and economic patterns.  Prerequisite:  ENGL 100/ESLA 117 or placement in ENGL& 101.  (SSwds)

GEOL 110 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY ~ 5
Study of geological processes and materials and the effects of human interaction with the geological environment: emphasis on global aspects of many geological conditions. Includes geological hazards, energy and mineral sources.  Field trips included.  (MSgs)

GEOL 140 NATURAL DISASTERS ~ 5
A study of the nature, causes, impacts, and methods of coping with natural disasters, including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, floods, tsunami, tornadoes, hurricanes, drought, blizzards, fires, and other topics. Lab work and field trips included.  (MSgsl)

HIST 124 ENRIRONMENTAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES ~ 3
This course will consider how people in the United States have interacted with nature over time and past and current paradigms for this interaction. This course will  investigate the origins of terms like conservation, ecology, wilderness, environmentalism, sustainability, urbanization and the "industrialization" of natural ecosystems, environmental justice and sustainability.  Prerequisite:  ENGL 100/ESLA 117 or placement in ENGL& 101.  (SSws)

IDS 170 INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABILITY ~ 5
An interdisciplinary, introductory course designed to expose students to the history, concepts, and practices of sustainability in three general areas:  environmental (ecology), economic (business), and social (community).  Includes a practical application of the concepts learned in the class as well as an exploratory section on environmental careers. Prerequisite: ENGL 100/ESLA 117 or placement in ENGL& 101. (SSwgs)

IDS 210 SCIENCE, ECONOMICS AND POLITICS OF SUSTAINABLE RESOURCE USE ~ 5
Use interdisciplinary methods to  evaluate and compare the uses of different key resources, using methodologies from science, economics and politics.  Students will learn about resources, such as energy or water, in the context of scarcity, depletion, climate change and impact on the environment.  Students will learn why these three disciplines must be considered by voters and decision makers as they try to formulate policies and make choices regarding sustainable resource use that are scientifically feasible as well as economically and politically acceptable.  Recommended preparation: Math 98.  Prerequisite: ENGL 100/ESLA 117 or placement in ENGL& 101.  (SS,MSwgs)

MATH 121 MATHEMATICAL MODELING AND THE ENVIRONMENT ~ 5
Exploration of linear, power, exponential, logistic, logarithmic, and difference equations using data analysis and regression.  Students will create mathematical models from environmentally themed data sets to better understand different types of relationships between variables.  Quantitative reasoning will be heavily emphasized.  Graphing calculator required.  Prerequisite:  MATH 99 with a grade "C" or better.  (MS,Q,SRs)

PHIL 132 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS ~ 5
How humanity conceives of its environment is central to an understanding of how humans should act and think of themselves as part of planet Earth.  Topics to be covered include:  an historical examination of current attitudes and practices, competing religious and cultural perspectives, anthropocentrism, animal rights and ecocentrism.  (Hdgs)

PHYS 109 ENERGY:  USE AND CONSEQUENCES ~ 5
Conceptual introduction to physics principles relative to energy conversion including oil, hydroelectric, electricity generation, nuclear, fossil fuel, and alternative fuel sources.  Elementary mechanics, thermodynamics and environmental impacts will be considered.  Recommended preparation:  MATH 098.  (MSls)

PHYS 112 ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSICS ~ 5
Introduction to the physical aspects of environmental science.  Topics include energy and matter transfers between water, earth and atmospheric systems.  Current environmental problems will provide the common themes.  Lab work included. Recommended preparation:  MATH 098.  (MSlgs)

PSYC 240 ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR ~ 5
Investigates the influence of human behavior in creating environmental problems.  Applies behavioral and social science knowledge to changing behaviors and systems to reduce the problems.  Includes the role of cognitive processes, learned behavior, reinforcement, cultural norms, education, religion, economics, government, political processes, environmental organizations, and ecological science in shaping the behaviors that contribute to the problems.  Local, national, and global issues considered such as global warming, recycling, energy use, biodiversity, pollution and population.  (SSgs)